Last updated on October 30, 2019

On October 28, 2017, local communities across the county will participate in the 14th “National Prescription Drug Take Back Day“. The Drug Enforcement Administration and local law enforcement organizations coordinate Take Back Day events every April and October. The goal is two-fold: reduce the potential for misuse of unused prescription medications and educate the public about safe drug disposal methods.

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Last updated on April 13, 2021

Americans are taking more and more prescription drugs, both legally and illegally, and communities across the country are struggling to deal with the health, financial, and environmental effects. A particular hot-button issue is the safe disposal of expired and unwanted medication. Currently, stakeholders including pharmaceutical manufacturers, product stewardship organizations, federal, state, and local governments, individual pharmacies, and other healthcare entities are working to develop solutions. Medical waste disposal companies who are also reverse distributors like Sharps Compliance are playing a major role to assist these groups in the proper containment, transport, and destruction of unused pharmaceuticals.

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Last updated on May 6, 2019

Prescription drug abuse is a growing epidemic in the United States. Opioids, depressants and stimulants are the most abused medications. According to the Los Angeles Times, the leading cause of death from unintentional injuries in the U.S. is drug-related poisonings, which has surpassed automobile accidents. Between 1999 and 2006, deaths from drug poisoning have almost doubled. The first step towards preventing drug abuse is proper medication disposal.

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Last updated on May 6, 2019

In our last blog post, we explored how prescription drug abuse has become an epidemic in the United States. This week we will discuss how to prevent prescription drug abuse and what to do with any unused medications.

Many opioid abusers get the prescription drugs from friends or relatives for free, according to a study by JAMA Internal Medicine. Other sources include getting a prescription from one or more doctors, stealing or buying prescription drugs from friends or family and buying prescription drugs from drug dealers.1

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