Type I and Type II Diabetes: What’s the Difference?

Many misconceptions exist about the differences between Type I and Type II Diabetes, a disease which affects 29.1 million people in the United States.1  Diabetes is a chronic disease, in which the pancreas produces less of or completely stops producing the hormone insulin. Insulin is essential in order to live. It breaks down the sugars in the body, converting them to energy.

Type I Diabetes, also referred to as juvenile diabetes, is commonly diagnosed in children and young adults. However, older adults can also contract Type I. It occurs when the pancreas completely stops producing insulin. The exact  cause of Type I is still unknown, but genetics and viral infections are thought to play a part.2 Treatment for Type I involves taking artificial insulin either by injections via a syringe or insulin pen or a pump, a device that delivers insulin through a catheter underneath the skin.3 Rapid-acting insulin begins decreasing blood  sugars within 10-30 minutes and is good to take before eating. Long-acting insulin helps stabilize sugars over a longer period of time (20-24 hours).4

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Part 2: Preventing Prescription Drug Abuse

In our last blog post, we explored how prescription drug abuse has become an epidemic in the United States. This week we will discuss how to prevent prescription drug abuse and what to do with any unused medications.

Many opioid abusers get the prescription drugs from friends or relatives for free, according to a study by JAMA Internal Medicine. Other sources include getting a prescription from one or more doctors, stealing or buying prescription drugs from friends or family and buying prescription drugs from drug dealers.1

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Sharps Compliance Expands Its Service Offerings to Include Route-Based Pickup

Sharps Compliance now offers route-based pickup services for Pennsylvania, Maryland and Northern Ohio with the acquisition of Alpha Bio Med Services. The Company plans to add New York, New Jersey and Virginia to the service area over the next few months. Additionally, Sharps Compliance is exploring the addition of a facility and treatment operation in Eastern Pennsylvania.

The acquisition allows Sharps Compliance to supplement its national service offering of the industry-leading medical waste mailback systems with geographically-focused medical waste route-based pickup service in the Northeast. In addition to the Northeast, the Company also announced the expansion of its Texas operations to also offer the route-based pickup service offering.

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Part 1: The Prescription Drug Abuse Epidemic

Prescription drug abuse has become a growing epidemic in the United States. Fifty-two million people over the age of 12 have used prescription drugs non-medically at least once during their lifetime.1 Every day 44 people die from an overdose of painkillers.2 Prescription drug abuse occurs when drugs have psychoactive (mind-altering) properties and are not taken as prescribed or are taken by someone to whom they were not prescribed.3 The most abused types of drugs are opioids, followed by tranquilizers and stimulants.4

Opioids are pain medications that decrease the strength of pain signals to the brain and affect those brain areas controlling emotion, which reduces the effects of a painful stimulus. Opioids include oxycodone (e.g., OxyContin, Percocet), morphine (e.g., Kadian) and hydrocodone (e.g., Vicodin). Since these drugs affect the regions of the brain responsible for reward, some users may experience a euphoric reaction.5

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4th of July Fireworks Safety

This weekend is Independence Day. One of our traditions is to watch fireworks displays or shoot them off ourselves. In 2006, 9,200 fireworks-related injuries were treated in U.S. hospital emergency rooms. The trend in fireworks-related injuries has been mostly up since 1996 with spikes in 2000-2001, primarily due to celebrations around the advent of a new millennium. The highest injury rates were for children ages 10 to 14. 75 percent of all injured were male.

Most fireworks injuries involve burns, but contusions, lacerations and other types of injuries are possible. Let’s look at some safety precautions for being around fireworks.

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