Last updated on September 3, 2019

Do you know that hospital acquired infections (HAIs) can have a direct correlation to reprocessed medical devices according to a Johns Hopkins study published in October 2018?1  Have you read that The ECRI Institute, an independent and trusted authority on healthcare practices and products that improve the safety, quality, and cost-effectiveness of patient care, listed “Mishandling Flexible Endoscopes after Disinfection Can Lead to Patient Infections” with an emphasis on reprocessing on the “2019 Top 10 Health Technology Hazards”?2

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Last updated on January 15, 2019

Vaccines can prevent many life threatening diseases. Pharmacists, nurse practitioners and physician assistants can administer immunizations in many places, including local pharmacies and retail clinics. Vaccines are generally very safe and can help eradicate some diseases. For instance, polio once caused paralysis and even death. Due to the administration of the injectable polio vaccine, there are now no reports of confirmed polio in the United States.

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Last updated on October 30, 2019

Flu season is upon us, and it’s important to know how to protect yourself. Influenza, more commonly referred to as the flu, is an acute viral infection caused by an influenza virus. Common symptoms include muscle and joint pain, high fever, sore throat and runny nose. The flu affects between 5 and 20 percent of Americans each year. Approximately 200,000 people are hospitalized due to flu-related symptoms, and anywhere from 3,000 to 49,000 people die each year from flu-related causes.

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Last updated on January 16, 2019

So the vet just diagnosed your pet with diabetes mellitus, which means that your pet isn’t producing enough insulin which is required for the body to efficiently use sugars, fats, and proteins. Diabetes mellitus is most often diagnosed in older dogs, primarily female dogs and older cats, most often male cats. Younger animals can also be afflicted.

Can diabetes in animals be managed? For most animals, diabetes is managed long term by the injection of insulin once or twice a day by the owner or caretaker. While some diabetic cats can be treated with oral medications instead of injections, oral medications are rarely effective in dogs. According to the College of Veterinary Medicine at Washington State University, there are three general types of insulin used in dogs and cats:

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