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Last updated on February 8, 2018

In the 1980s, infusion therapy began to be offered in the home in response to developments in clinical administration and pressure to reduce costs. For the patient, home infusion offers more convenience and allows them to live more normal lives while undergoing treatment. Today, the industry has continued to grow, making up $9-11 billion dollars spent each year in the U.S. healthcare market. Part of that money is spent on the disposal of regulated wastes and management of equipment in both the pharmacy and the patient’s home. Sharps Compliance offers a variety of home infusion solutions.

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Last updated on February 10, 2020

Reducing Your Medical Waste Through RightClassificationSM – Part Three

In the first 2 parts (part 1, part 2) of this series, we defined Regulated Medical Waste (RMW) and discussed how it was regulated, contained and disposed. In the final part of this series, we will discuss what a facility can specifically do to reduce its volume of RMW through proper segregation (RightClassificationSM) and therefore reduce spending.

1. Review your policy.
Your medical waste management plan can be included as a part of your Bloodborne Pathogens Exposure Control Plan or it can be maintained as a separate policy document. Regardless, make sure RMW is clearly defined and employees are able to access your policy for clear guidance. For example, if your policy defines RMW as “blood and other body fluids” instead of “blood and OPIM” (with the definition of OPIM included), employees and even trainers may become confused. In addition, you must follow what your policy states. So make sure your policy is not forcing you to “wrong classify” your waste and spend more money than necessary.

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Last updated on February 10, 2020

Reducing Your Medical Waste Through RightClassificationSM – A Three Part Series

In part one of this series, we discussed how OSHA defines regulated medical waste (RMW). In the second part of this series, we will address how to properly segregate, contain, and dispose of RMW.

Who regulates RMW disposal?

While OSHA defines RMW and regulates its containment and safe handling by employees, individual states, Department of Transportation (DOT), United States Postal Service (USPS), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulate the transport and disposal.

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