Managing Pet Diabetes

So the vet just diagnosed your pet with diabetes mellitus, which means that your pet isn’t producing enough insulin which is required for the body to efficiently use sugars, fats, and proteins. Diabetes mellitus is most often diagnosed in older dogs, primarily female dogs and older cats, most often male cats. Younger animals can also be afflicted.

Can diabetes in animals be managed? For most animals, diabetes is managed long term by the injection of insulin once or twice a day by the owner or caretaker. While some diabetic cats can be treated with oral medications instead of injections, oral medications are rarely effective in dogs. According to the College of Veterinary Medicine at Washington State University, there are three general types of insulin used in dogs and cats:

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Sharps Patient Support System (Podcast)

Pharmaguy interviews David P. Tusa, CEO and President of Sharps Compliance, who describes the Sharps Patient Support System and how his company collects data from sharps containers to determine whether patients are adhering to their medication therapies.

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Hazardous Waste in Healthcare, Part 2: MANAGING YOUR HAZARDOUS WASTE

In Part 1 of Hazardous Waste in Healthcare, we defined hazardous wastes. In Part 2, we will discuss identifying hazardous waste in your facility, as well as proper containment, transport, treatment, recordkeeping, and training.

Hazardous Waste Determination

Proper hazardous waste determination is essential to the success of the healthcare facility’s hazardous waste management program. The RCRA regulations at 40 CFR §262.11 require that any person who produces or generates a waste must determine if that waste is hazardous. These same regulations present the steps in the hazardous waste identification process. All healthcare facilities should have a program in place that manages hazardous waste according to not only federal RCRA regulations but also any local, city, and state regulations that may apply.

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Hazardous Waste in Healthcare, Part 1: DEFINING HAZARDOUS WASTE

One of the biggest challenges for today’s healthcare workers is defining the different categories of waste streams they manage on a daily basis. Even the names can be confusing. There’s hazardous, biohazardous, RCRA, universal, pharmaceutical, regulated medical, red bag, pathological, chemo, infectious, isolation, and the list goes on. Perhaps the most confusing and dangerous wastes facilities deal with is hazardous waste. Hazardous waste in healthcare is much more complicated than biohazardous waste and more often than not, improperly recognized and categorized by healthcare professionals. So, what is hazardous waste?

What is Hazardous Waste?

The first step in identifying hazardous waste is learning to recognize products that will be considered hazardous wastes when discarded or as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) defines it, “no longer of value.”1 This could occur when the material has expired, e.g., drugs or when it is no longer needed, e.g. mercury-containing thermostats. The EPA developed four lists of specific hazardous wastes (Listed Wastes) and four hazardous waste types with defining characteristics (Characteristic Wastes) to help determine specific hazards.

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