Two-Thirds of Americans Improperly Dispose of Medication

Two-thirds of Americans don’t know what to do with unused prescription drugs according to a nationwide survey of 1,000 adults conducted for Sharps Compliance. The findings showed that 2 out of 3 people either toss their medications into the garbage or flush them down the toilet, potentially threatening the safety of others and the environment

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Clarifying MedSafe

Medication disposal can be confusing. The practice is regulated by many government agencies, and there are a number of rules to follow to ensure you are correctly disposing of any unused medications. Sharps Compliance’s MedSafe is a collection receptacle for ultimate-user medication disposal. This article will clarify the rules and regulations of disposing of medications in MedSafe and other similar kiosks.
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Preventing Prescription Drug Abuse at Home

Prescription drug abuse is a growing epidemic in the United States. Opioids, depressants and stimulants are the most abused medications. According to the Los Angeles Times, the leading cause of death from unintentional injuries in the U.S. is drug-related poisonings, which has surpassed automobile accidents. Between 1999 and 2006, deaths from drug poisoning have almost doubled. The first step towards preventing drug abuse is proper medication disposal.

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Medication Disposal in Long-Term Care

Nurses practicing in senior care have very busy work schedules. From caring for patients to distributing medications to updating records, their days can become overwhelming. One of the more time-consuming tasks is the disposal of unused medication.

When a resident’s medication is permanently discontinued, it must be properly disposed. Prior to updates to the 2014 Drug Enforcement Agency’s regulations which implemented the Secure and Responsible Drug Disposal Act of 2010, few safe, efficient and environmentally-preferred options were available to communities for controlled drug disposal. Typically, the Director of Nursing and another nurse would itemize the drugs to be destroyed and then undertake the time-consuming task of emptying them out of their containers or blister packs. Removing individual pills from blister packs can not only be time-consuming (and therefore, costly) but also painful and difficult. Once removed, the drugs were typically placed into the toilet or mixed with an undesirable substance, such as kitty litter or dissolved in a chemical prior to putting them into the trash. After all of the medication was removed and destroyed, the residents’ identifying information on the packaging had to be concealed and disposed of safely to prevent disclosure of protected health information.

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