Managing Pet Diabetes

So the vet just diagnosed your pet with diabetes mellitus, which means that your pet isn’t producing enough insulin which is required for the body to efficiently use sugars, fats, and proteins. Diabetes mellitus is most often diagnosed in older dogs, primarily female dogs and older cats, most often male cats. Younger animals can also be afflicted.

Can diabetes in animals be managed? For most animals, diabetes is managed long term by the injection of insulin once or twice a day by the owner or caretaker. While some diabetic cats can be treated with oral medications instead of injections, oral medications are rarely effective in dogs. According to the College of Veterinary Medicine at Washington State University, there are three general types of insulin used in dogs and cats:

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Is It the Flu?

Flu? Ebola? Enterovirus 68? The fall of 2014 is presenting unique challenges to Americans everywhere as people try to determine if they have a cold, the flu, or even the first symptoms of Ebola. Scheduling time to discuss this with a healthcare professional will help to determine what exactly a person is at risk for, what prevention methods are recommended, diagnosis of the disease based on symptoms, what treatment to use, and even development of a plan to keep you, friends, and family healthy.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that everyone six months of age and older get an annual flu shot1. People at high-risk, such as those with heart conditions, diabetes, and asthma, as well as pregnant women and people over the age of 65 need to get their annual flu shot to potentially avoid getting seriously ill from complications of influenza. For more information on the flu vaccine, click here.

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Who is Maintaining Your Medical Waste?

I don’t have time to close up and label the medical waste box
– so the medical waste transport driver does it.

This is a statement often uttered by busy employees responsible for managing their facility’s medical waste. Whether using a pickup service or mailing medical waste, only properly trained persons at the generating facility should package, label, and sign the tracking form for the waste shipment. That does not include a pickup service driver or untrained facility employee.

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Part Three: What’s Going into that Red Bag?

Reducing Your Medical Waste Through RightClassificationSM – Part Three

In the first 2 parts (part 1, part 2) of this series, we defined Regulated Medical Waste (RMW) and discussed how it was regulated, contained and disposed. In the final part of this series, we will discuss what a facility can specifically do to reduce its volume of RMW through proper segregation (RightClassificationSM) and therefore reduce spending.

1. Review your policy.
Your medical waste management plan can be included as a part of your Bloodborne Pathogens Exposure Control Plan or it can be maintained as a separate policy document. Regardless, make sure RMW is clearly defined and employees are able to access your policy for clear guidance. For example, if your policy defines RMW as “blood and other body fluids” instead of “blood and OPIM” (with the definition of OPIM included), employees and even trainers may become confused. In addition, you must follow what your policy states. So make sure your policy is not forcing you to “wrong classify” your waste and spend more money than necessary.

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Part Two: What’s Going into that Red Bag?

Reducing Your Medical Waste Through RightClassificationSM – A Three Part Series

In part one of this series, we discussed how OSHA defines regulated medical waste (RMW). In the second part of this series, we will address how to properly segregate, contain, and dispose of RMW.

Who regulates RMW disposal?

While OSHA defines RMW and regulates its containment and safe handling by employees, individual states, Department of Transportation (DOT), United States Postal Service (USPS), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulate the transport and disposal.

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