How to Dispose of Chemotherapy Waste

Choosing the right containment, transport, and treatment for waste items contaminated with chemotherapy or antineoplastic agents can be confusing. Questions that come up include, “Is chemo managed as hazardous waste, or is it medical waste? Do I have to use a yellow container and chemo labeling or a black container and hazardous waste labeling?” To answer these questions, we must consider how this waste is classified, segregated, and ultimately regulated.

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Healthcare-Related Wastes Explained

Regulated medical waste, sharps waste, isolation waste, hazardous waste, and universal waste…what’s the difference, and how should they be segregated for proper disposal? This blog will discuss the differences between these healthcare-related wastes and how to safely dispose of them while saving money and reducing your chance of regulatory violations.

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Understanding the EPA’s Proposed Amalgam Separator Rule

In September 2014, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed a new rule regarding dental amalgam. This regulation would require all existing and new dental practices to use amalgam separators to prevent amalgam from discharging into publicly owned treatment works (POTWs).

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Needle Disposal in Public Places

Every year throughout the United States, 8 million people use more than 3 billion sharps to manage medical conditions at home. Needle disposal in public places is a growing concern. With more and more Americans self-injecting, many employers are choosing to follow the guidance included in OSHA’s Bloodborne Pathogens Standard to help reduce the potential of employee and customer needlesticks. If self-injectors do not have convenient access to proper sharps disposal, the needle typically ends up in the trash or discarded in a parking lot or other public area.

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